Author Topic: Species separation on Earth.  (Read 1613 times)

wapatango

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Re: Species separation on Earth.
« Reply #15 on: May 02, 2013, 09:08:57 PM »
I don’t think we’re using the same definition here, so what do you mean by information?  Please explain what you think information is.  After all, if we are using different definitions we’ll never be able to understand each other.   

Fletch_smf

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Re: Species separation on Earth.
« Reply #16 on: May 05, 2013, 04:33:50 AM »
I don’t think we’re using the same definition here, so what do you mean by information?  Please explain what you think information is.  After all, if we are using different definitions we’ll never be able to understand each other.

Good point. What is DNA? Vastly summarised below. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DNA

DNA is a very long string made up of only four nucleotides: guanine, adenine, thymine, and cytosine. (G, A, T & C)
This long string of letters is broken up into groups of 3 letter "words" called codons with each of the 3 letters being any of the 4 nucleotides. 4 x 4 x 4 is 64 words. (GGG, GGA, GGT ... to CCC)
3 of these codons indicate "stop" or "end" marking the end of a group of "words" (or a "sentence"). TAA, TAG and TGA.
The remaining 61 x 3 letter words are used to encode 20 standard amino acids, meaning there are duplicate words that mean the same amino acid.

So a strand of DNA is something like a book, made up of sentences, made up of words, made up of 3 letters. RNA copies sentences from the book, and each 3 letter word generates the appropriate Amino Acids which create and modify proteins. This is what causes life to grow from a single cell to the full grown human/starfish/oak tree/etc and helps protect it from attack from the outside, and most importantly, helps it reproduce.

So information is the DNA, the long string of those 4 nucleotides. As those letters are changed, either by recombination during sexual reproduction, or by mutation, so changes the creature that is created by it.

And as I have said previously, the fact that all life on the planet, from the simplest bacteria, to plants, to fish, to reptiles to mammals is made up of the same 4 letter, 64 word dictionary, encoding the same 20 amino acids to process proteins; and that this process is all that is required to make all the vast array of life that we see around us, is astonishing evidence to indicate that all life started from a single source and gradually developed.

But, back to the point about information, changes in DNA are the addition of new information. How can they not be?

wapatango

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Re: Species separation on Earth.
« Reply #17 on: May 25, 2013, 07:29:44 PM »
That is a great explanation of DNA, but I was actually asking something something different.  DNA is information, but information isn't just DNA.  These posts are information, at least I would classify as them such.  :)  So, what is information?  What makes something information?  What are the properties of information?  I hope my question makes more sense now.  Sorry that I was clear before. 

Fletch_smf

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Re: Species separation on Earth.
« Reply #18 on: May 31, 2013, 05:07:11 AM »
Sorry. Lol. But no,I'm just as confused. What are you saying?

GregDarcy

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Re: Species separation on Earth.
« Reply #19 on: December 12, 2013, 05:01:09 PM »
I live in Brisbane, capital of Queesnland, but I was born in Rockhampton which is about 8 hours north, where you see the 20 degree line cutting through the top of the continent. That's the Tropic of Capricorn, and to give you some bearing it's North twin, the Tropic of Cancer passes between Florida and Cuba so that's the climate I grew up in.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Map_of_Australia.png

The 40 degrees line that passes between the mainland and Tasmania is mirrored by a line that passes between Philadelphia and New York. That's roughly the climate of our nation. The vast interior is desert, so the 22 million population lives predominantly down the east coast and along the bottom of the mainland.

Papua New Guinea is our closest neighbour and can be seen at the North of the Map, with approx 150 km or 100 miles at the closest points.

All our predators (apart from humans) are of the small variety. We have some of the most poisonous snakes and spiders in the world but no large animal predators. Well, that's not entire true, I suppose. Wild Boar probably count as a predator, but generally the most dangerous animals we have are dog size, dingos and the like. And our coast line, especially in Queensland, the home of the Great Barrier Reef, is patrolled by a lot of sharks.

Wombats are indeed, another one of ours. Possums, Quokkas, Quolls and the blue tongue and frill necked lizards are pretty special as well. Not to mention the Tasmanian Devil (looks nothing like the Warner Bros cartoon character) and the Tasmanian Tiger, extinct now due to our interference.

Lots of forest around the coast line; our famous Australian "Bush"; but the red center of Australia is so named for red dust and sand and there is an awful lot of it, making the centre of this great land virtually uninhabitable.

That about answer the question?
Fletch, you are using the latitude spread of Australia to compare the Australian climate to that of North America. This is not valid. The land, or more specifically, the lack of it has a large bearing on climate. There is large land bridge (i.e. Canada) between Northern USA and the Arctic This means that the cold air from the poles can basically sweep down from the Arctic un-meliorated. The same zone below Australia is ocean. This supplies warmth and humidity to the air traversing it. The end result is that the southern parts of Australia are significantly warmer than the equivalent latitudes in North America. Similarly, the Gulf Stream moderates the climate of Europe, compared to North America, so London, at Latitude 50N is actually warmer than New York at Latitude 40N (roughly) Hobart, at Latitude 42S is warmer again. My sister who lives in Tasmania, actually experiences a milder climate than I do in the Blue Mountains west of Sydney.

Fletch_smf

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Re: Species separation on Earth.
« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2013, 10:05:03 PM »
I live in Brisbane, capital of Queesnland, but I was born in Rockhampton which is about 8 hours north, where you see the 20 degree line cutting through the top of the continent. That's the Tropic of Capricorn, and to give you some bearing it's North twin, the Tropic of Cancer passes between Florida and Cuba so that's the climate I grew up in.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Map_of_Australia.png

The 40 degrees line that passes between the mainland and Tasmania is mirrored by a line that passes between Philadelphia and New York. That's roughly the climate of our nation. The vast interior is desert, so the 22 million population lives predominantly down the east coast and along the bottom of the mainland.

Papua New Guinea is our closest neighbour and can be seen at the North of the Map, with approx 150 km or 100 miles at the closest points.

All our predators (apart from humans) are of the small variety. We have some of the most poisonous snakes and spiders in the world but no large animal predators. Well, that's not entire true, I suppose. Wild Boar probably count as a predator, but generally the most dangerous animals we have are dog size, dingos and the like. And our coast line, especially in Queensland, the home of the Great Barrier Reef, is patrolled by a lot of sharks.

Wombats are indeed, another one of ours. Possums, Quokkas, Quolls and the blue tongue and frill necked lizards are pretty special as well. Not to mention the Tasmanian Devil (looks nothing like the Warner Bros cartoon character) and the Tasmanian Tiger, extinct now due to our interference.

Lots of forest around the coast line; our famous Australian "Bush"; but the red center of Australia is so named for red dust and sand and there is an awful lot of it, making the centre of this great land virtually uninhabitable.

That about answer the question?
Fletch, you are using the latitude spread of Australia to compare the Australian climate to that of North America. This is not valid. The land, or more specifically, the lack of it has a large bearing on climate. There is large land bridge (i.e. Canada) between Northern USA and the Arctic This means that the cold air from the poles can basically sweep down from the Arctic un-meliorated. The same zone below Australia is ocean. This supplies warmth and humidity to the air traversing it. The end result is that the southern parts of Australia are significantly warmer than the equivalent latitudes in North America. Similarly, the Gulf Stream moderates the climate of Europe, compared to North America, so London, at Latitude 50N is actually warmer than New York at Latitude 40N (roughly) Hobart, at Latitude 42S is warmer again. My sister who lives in Tasmania, actually experiences a milder climate than I do in the Blue Mountains west of Sydney.

Good point.

Would you like to make a comment about species separation?